Planning for a Community Food Hub in Dudley

Through the recently launched Dudley Real Food Hub, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI), Alternatives for Community and Environment (ACE), and The Food Project have been working alongside residents, gardeners, and food businesses to grow and strengthen Dudley’s community food economy. Anchored by a 10,000 square foot greenhouse owned by DSNI’s land trust and operatedContinue reading Planning for a Community Food Hub in Dudley

URBAN FARMING, ONE VACANT LOT AT A TIME [repost from YES!]

YES! WINTER 2015, ISSUE 72 :: yesmagazine.org [Download PDF] URBAN FARMING, ONE VACANT LOT AT A TIME By Penn Loh Tony Hernandez remembers playing as a child on the vacant lots in the Dudley Street neighborhood of Boston. In the 1980s, white flight and disinvestment had so devastated this neighborhood that more than 20 percentContinue reading URBAN FARMING, ONE VACANT LOT AT A TIME [repost from YES!]

Wellspring Collaborative article [repost]

Wellspring Collaborative’s worker-owned upholstery business provides entry-level jobs to underemployed inner-city By Laura Newberry | laura.newberry@masslive.com SPRINGFIELD – When Carlos Perez moved from Puerto Rico to Waterbury, Conn. in April 2012, his main priority was finding good work. Perez could barely speak English and soon found that the language barrier would be an impediment toContinue reading Wellspring Collaborative article [repost]

Aaron Tanaka featured as a “Main Street Job Creator”

UEP Visiting Practitioner Aaron Tanaka is featured in this YES! Magazine article on “8 Main Street Job Creators Who Are Rebooting the Economy—Starting with Those Who Need It Most“. Below is the excerpt profiling Aaron and his work with Boston Workers Alliance, Center for Economic Democracy, and the Boston’s Youth Participatory Budgeting process. *****REPOST***** AaronContinue reading Aaron Tanaka featured as a “Main Street Job Creator”

How Co-ops Helped Produce Foot Soldiers for Civil Rights [repost]

REPOST from COLORLINES – Interview with Jessica Gordon Nembhard about her new book on African American Cooperatives by Carla Murphy, Monday, March 10 2014 Southern pews and pulpits weren’t the only source of people power during the long civil rights movement. So, too, were cooperative economic enterprises. These worker or consumer-owned alternatives to U.S. capitalismContinue reading How Co-ops Helped Produce Foot Soldiers for Civil Rights [repost]

Dudley Resident Gardens: Summer 2013 Survey Results

On two hot days in mid-July 2013, two dozen youth went out into the streets of the Dudley neighborhood in Roxbury to survey “backyard” gardens and interview gardeners. The youth, from Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative (DSNI) and The Food Project, were working with the support of the Practical Visionaries Workshop (PVW) to document how muchContinue reading Dudley Resident Gardens: Summer 2013 Survey Results

Towards a More Transformative Community Economic Development

By Ian Adelman, Emily Earle, and Penn Loh [Note: This article is based on Adelman and Earle’s 2012 Masters Thesis for the Tufts Urban & Environmental Policy and Planning. To download: Earle Thesis – FINAL  Adelman Thesis Final] Why transformative? At the global level, it is easy to see the excesses, if not the fatalContinue reading Towards a More Transformative Community Economic Development

Community Control Over Development: A Conceptual Framework

In our first Practical Visionaries Workshop in 2011, one project team explored community control over development as a key means of realizing a justainable city. Below, we summarize 3 key strategies for community control: 1) government policy, 2) direct negotiation with landowners and developers, and 3) endogenous development and ownership. In addition to this framework,Continue reading Community Control Over Development: A Conceptual Framework